Salmonella Poisoning, its Symptoms, Risks, and how to Prevent It

Salmonella Poisoning, its Symptoms, Risks, and how to Prevent It

Oct 08

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, salmonella poisoning, or salmonellosis, affects approximately one in six people in the United States every year. That’s roughly 48 million of the country’s population. Salmonellosis is a type of food poisoning that is accompanied by fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea that may occur 12 to 72 hours after exposure. Symptoms of salmonellosis last for about 4 to 7 days among healthy individuals. However, young children, seniors, and those with weak immune system may suffer from more serious complications that may even result in death.

There are many causes of salmonellosis, and poor food handling is considered one of them. According to the website of these Houston personal injury lawyers, restaurant owners who fail to ensure that foods served in their premises are prepared in a sanitary way could be held accountable in a negligence case. In some cases, food manufacturers could also be held liable for foods contaminated during the process of manufacturing and packaging.

For healthy individuals, salmonella poisoning lasts for up to three days, and doesn’t require medications such as antibiotics. However, because symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea and vomiting, the person suffering from this disease are at higher risk of dehydration. Drinking plenty of fluids will replenish the lost electrolytes during diarrhea. However, you should stick to rehydration drinks and water, and should avoid coffee and soda for optimum rehydration.

There are also a myriad of possible ways on how to prevent salmonellosis. Consuming unpasteurized milk and raw or uncooked eggs may put you at risk of salmonellosis, so you should stay away from them to keep salmonellosis at bay. Remember to wash vegetables thoroughly when eating them raw. You should also wash your hands before and after food preparation, and in between handling different items. Finally, uncooked food should always be stored separately from cooked and ready-to-eat foods to avoid cross contamination.

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